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touches on it. >> we were talking about a lot of references to the 701 words by abraham lincoln. >> first of all, and there are not a heck of a lot of second inaugural addresses out there. lincoln's definitely stand out. possibly george w. bush. so much has happened in his first term. it was such a different picture international arena than it was at the beginning of his first term. >> the second inaugural address was longer than the first. >> we have quite a challenge with president clinton. the second address was rather long. he had a way with the audience. i think he made up for it with his delivery. he was very captivating with people. i think inaugural addresses and typically tended to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity. it is that a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. it is much more rhetorical and poetic. >> the president will deliver his state of union address. >> that will be his policy agenda. it will also be a speech that makes a lot more news than the inaugural address. the inaugural address kind of comes and goes. the
not always work out well for vice presidents. in 1865, lincoln's second term, that's significant speech will remember -- that magnificent speech, healing speech -- his vice president was ander johnsorew johnson. affusion ticket in 1864 -- a fusion ticket in 1864. johnson arrived with the flu. he gave, for what it was all accounts, a completely inebriated address. lincoln was mortified. it said the public image -- set the public image of andrew johnson. another disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge's. he used that opportunity to state and how the filibuster should be done away with. president roosevelt's second inauguration, that is when the congress started before the president. now presidents and vice presidents began to be sworn outside of the steps. there was one exception in the long tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in t
inaugural addresses and a lot of references to lincoln's second saturday much more famous than his first address but that is the exception. guest: i suppose it is. there aren't a lot of inaugural addresses out there. but lincoln's definitely stands out. i'm trying to think offhand whose president's second inaugural address resinated more than the first. possibly my president, george bush. because it was such a different picture at the second term than at the beginning of his first. host: both of you bush, 43, president blin's second inaugural address was longer than the first. guest: yes, we had quite a challenge with president clinton. as most people know, he tends to like to speak long. the second address was rather long but, you know, he had a way with the audience and i think he made up for it with the delivery and he was captivating with people. although, i think a normal address typically tend to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity, it is not a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. so, you know, it is more rhetorical and poetic
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
this kind of insanity -- this kind of material. this happens to be the abraham lincoln inauguration, documenting that formal sense, but there is a quality to these inaugurations that are very important because the tone is very carefully constructed, often. sometimes you lose your control, such as with polk, but often times everybody knows that every aspect of an inauguration will be examined for meaning, what is being said, the undercurrents -- do you ride up to the capital in a carriage in splendor? do you walk back as a man of the people, as jimmy carter did? there is careful balance. when you look at some of this material, you can see over time that, in fact, they are carefully crafting it as well. i have always been amazed in looking at jimmy carter's inaugural serial, how informal his material tends to be compared to other presidents, and it is clearly a statement that following the nixon years, the imperial presidency, they were going to have a residency of the people -- presidency of the people. you notice that on his tickets, rather than having an inaugural ball, he has an i
was by abraham lincoln. guest: there are people who thinks that it outranks the gettysburg address. it is the greatest way sermon ever delivered in america. anyone who questions lincoln's spirituality as opposed to his denominational membership, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable addressed for its eloquence. for the message. at that point, clearly the war is almost over. the obvious thing to do would- be self congratulations. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. with malice toward none,lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. fdr acknowledges that for all the progress made, remember the famous line -- clothed, ill fed. he was acknowledging unfinished business. h
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, saveunbornlives.org and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
with his eloquence. and then, beyond the reflecting pool, the dignified columns of the lincoln memorial. whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of america will find it in the life of abraham lincoln. beyond those monuments to heroism is the potomac river, and on the far shore the sloping hills of arlington national cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or stars of david. they add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom. each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero i spoke of earlier. their lives ended in places called belleau wood, the argonne, omaha beach, salerno, and halfway around the world on guadalcanal, tarawa, pork chop hill, the chosin reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called vietnam. under one such marker lies a young man, martin treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to france with the famed rainbow division. there, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. we
of this inauguration is the completion of the capitol dome. in two years earlier, when lincoln became president, the dome was have finished, and it was an eyesore. the conventional wisdom, awe cannot finish this. to lincoln, the half finished dome symbolized a hal divided nation. it is a symbol that we can do a lot in this country. >> after the ceremony, the luncheon -- you mentioned new york food. how have you inserted new york into this experience? what will you be doing with the president and first lady? >> will serve a white wine from the finger lakes and a red wine from long island. both are worth winning. -- award-winning. losi, andpaul peo others did the tasting. we have cheese, new york. apple cobbler is made from apples from columbia county. the chef was trained in dutchess county. there is maple syrup that is part of the sauces that is from dutchess county as well. they serve some honey as well. from a.ing to serve it -- an apiary. a young woman started to have a business that was booming. it was wiped out by hurricane sandy. we got the honey from rochester. >> how did you get into th
dome. the completion of that occurred 150 years ago. two years earlier when lincoln became president, the dome was half finished. it was sort of an eyesore. the conventional wisdom was the cannot finish this dome. to lincoln, the half finished dome symbolize a half divided nation. he thought it should be finished. it was. it is a symbol that we can do a lot in this country, no matter how tough the times are. >> after the ceremony, the luncheon, you mentioned new york food. how have you inserted new york and do this experience --
figures i admire probably more than anybody in american history is dr. king and president lincoln. for me to have the opportunity to use the bible they used on the 105th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington is fitting. their actions and the movement they represent are the only reason that it is possible for me to be inaugurated. it is also a reminder for me that this country has gone through tough times before but we always come out on the other side. we're constantly perfecting our union and making it more fair. we want everybody to have a fair shot in this country. if you work hard, you can make it. regardless of where you come from or what you look like. it is probably the most important thing to keep in mind when you are president of the united states. i will uphold my oath of office at the same time letting me remind people of the sacrifices of the past. from the presidential inaugural committee host: first lady michelle obama just turned 49 last week. she will have a big role during the next couple of days. here is take twe
for being with us. the most memorable second term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: people think that it outranked the gettysburg address. i would say it is the greatest lay sermon delivered in america. anyone who questioned his spirituality, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable address. it is not a celebratory speech. at that point, the war is almost over. the most obvious thing to do would be some congratulations. host: with malice toward none. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. i see a country one-third ill clothed, ill fed. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address.
to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugural was the first to have african americans to take part. president george w. bush became the nation's 43rd president on january 20, 2001 after defeating al gore that ended in a supreme court decision in december of that year. the enaugust ration was attended by 3,000 people. this is about a 15 minutes. [applause] >> are you ready to take the oath? i, george walker bush do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help me god. congratulations. [applause] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, george w. bush. [applause] >> president clinton, distinguished guests and my fellow citizens, the peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet common in our country. with a simple oath, we affirm old traditions and make new beginnings. as i begin, i thank president clinton for his service to our nation. [applause] and i thank vice president gore for a contest co
. and then another. and then another. he gave them a quick -- a completely inebriated inaugural address. lincoln was mortified. i unfortunately for johnson, it sets a public image of the andrew johnson. another burly disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge as vice- president. he used his address to tell the senate how they should operate. it set him off on a bad -- starting in 1937, that is when the congress started before the president. now president and vice presidents are sworn outside on the steps. the vice president lost his chance to give an inaugural address. there was one exception in that long tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision.
and pennsylvania avenue before the parade starts? does everyone have to go around the capitol and lincoln memorial? >> this is a supersatisfying answer, we can get back to you. we have a team that concentrates on logistics. that was an issue four years ago with getting across pennsylvania. i can follow up afterwards and put you in touch with the right folks. >> what's your best guess for the running time of the ceremony from start to finish and parade from start to finish? >> i can handle the ceremony portion of it. we expect that the announcements on the platform, former presidents will begin around 11:00 and 30 minutes to announce everyone that will be seated on the platform. senator schumer opens the ceremony at 11:30 and expect the president to take the oath at noon and will be a couple -- beyonce immediately after that to wrap things up and the final musical act. and hope to have everyone back inside at 12:30. music begins at 9:30 in the morning and v.i.p.'s, past presidents will begin heading out to the platform at 9:45 in the morning. after the inaugural speech and the performances at the e
term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: people think that it outranked the gettysburg address. i would say it is the greatest lay sermon delivered in america. anyone who questioned his spirituality, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable address. it is not a celebratory speech. at that point, the war is almost over. the most obvious thing to do would be some congratulations. host: with malice toward none. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. i see a country one-third ill clothed, ill fed. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address. is it inaugurable? guest: he had a thin ski
. but 1961, laid service was planned at st. john's to recognize the tenants of abraham lincoln, the organist at st. john's found this in the archives and discussed it with church leaders at the time. they thought would be a good idea to have every president still living to sign it and every president that would follow them to sign it as well. so what we have inside this historic book are the signatures of herbert hoover, franklin roosevelt's, which was signed by his wife, harry truman, dwight eisenhower, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, to be carter, ronald reagan, george bush and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. at some point, when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact that and have them sign this very historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it does not sit in the president's piu anymore but it is one of those great pieces of history long associated with this church from 1856 to the present. one of the little-known facts about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custo
, four presidents took the oath of office. here abraham lincoln served his single term in congress, and john quincy adams, the only former president to return to serve in the house spoke out against slavery. today we also remember in event that took place outside the building but reverberated within. this year marks the 50th anniversary of the reverend r. luther king junior's march on washington, which spurred passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have with us a colleague, congressman john lewis, a speaker at that historic march. [applause] ongressman lewis' life exemplifies the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about what so we can all recognize you. [applause] -- take a bow so that we can all srecognize you. behind us, the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is at niagara falls. 6.is was painted in 1850 sike for me, niagara falls never fails to inspire a tremendous all of the natural beauty of our country. then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power, and possibility of america. i want to thank
"struggle" means. you may ahve heard about the two bibles he used, the lincoln bible and the mlk bible. should we care what book the oath is sworn upon? we go to san antonio, texas. liz is on the republican line. guest: i have been a democrat voter for 53 and i decided with everything i saw, i changed to republican. there are a lot o fissues i don't believe in is if it is in your heart you want to make a change -- you stand under the flag and say i am an american no matter once and i will do my best as a citizen, as a person that wants the best for the country and not just say one thing and expect handouts and expect -- all these kinds of changes. salute the flag -- my husband was in the military. i am an american patriot but when yo useu see things people vote for to get that vote, are you going to really stand and put a flag -- every day of my life i've had a flag in front of my home and i will never stop having that flag. and i would like to know how many of those people that are going to get helped with -- will stand under that flag and truly believe in the flag in which we should
lincoln. it is the right of everyone to have life and liberty. these unborn babies across the country are being killed. we have a pro-life charity and we are trying to call to attention a look at these innocent little ones and an urge for these women to choose life. over 50% of americans are pro- life now, that should be the number-one topic. you should be talking about a personhood amendment, just like lincoln talked about freeing the slaves. host: we will be talking about the agenda for the second term in the last half of "washington journal" this morning. we will talk about whether there could be another contraception fight like in the first term. the front page of "the washington times" this morning is on the abortion battle. an estimated total of 54 million pregnancies have been terminated since 1973, but the moral and political question around it remains on settled, when the supreme court issued its decision so many years ago. in a last hour we will be talking to a writer for "vanity fair." he will be talking about the women behind roe v. wade and we will be talking about that d
the steps of the lincoln memorial to finally reach the walls of the white house. [cheers and applause] it is that spirit that we not only inaugurates a new administration, we have the hope, vision, unity, and the renewed call to greatness inspired by the 44th president of the united states, barack obama. thank you and god bless america. at this time, i call upon dr. rick warren, pastor of a church in lake forest, california, to provide an invocation. [applause] >> let us pray. almighty god, our father, everything we see and everything we can't see exist because of you alone. it all comes from you and it all belongs to you and it all exists for your glory. history is your story. the scripture tells us that the lord is our god. the lord is one. you are compassionate and merciful one shoule. your loving to everyone you have made. today we rejoice in america's peaceful transfer of power for the 44th time. we celebrate a lynch point in history with the inauguration of our first african-american president of the united states. [cheers and applause] we are so grateful to live in this land, a
amendment and thank you for invoking the words of abraham lincoln. >> this amendment increases funding to the national cemetery association account by $1 million, offset by reductions in the s.b.a. disaster loan program. as i understand it, the the gentlewoman from has heard from her constituents that these additional funds are needed to address extensive tree damage in new york and new jersey national cemeteries. v.a. cemeteries, our national shrines are a lasting tribute that commemorate veterans' service and sacrifice. the amendment will ensure that the cemeteries affected by hurricane sandy will be repaired in a quick and efficient manner and i urge all members to support this amendment and i yield back. ms. velazquez: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from new york. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it and the amendment is agreed to. . pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in par
and the president as to whether we could fight a civil war and finish the dome. president lincoln said if people see the capitol going on, it's a sign that we intend, the union shall go on. congress came together and were able to complete the capitol dome in the midst of the civil war and senator schumer selected this theme knowing that we have challenges that we face as a country now. but if you look back what we accomplished 150 years, we can find faith in america's future and overcome obstacles. these are the remarks throughout the day and in some of the program material to folks who will be seeing the ceremonies and you will see in various elements throughout the program. the day for our committee really begins at 9:00 when the members head to the white house for a coffee and tea with the president. senator mcconnell joins that group. from there, there is coffee with the president, vice president, the first lady and dr. biden as well. everyone begins to make their way back to the capitol at 10, 10:30, depending on how the coffee and tea proceeds. our members come and they are there and get ahead
, today looking at the lincoln memorial. live here on c-span. the lincoln memorial in washington. up the steps, kids from the fifth grade from watkins elementary school in washington will read the entire speech from martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream"speech . we are streaming all of our coverage today. president obama begins his second term. sunday is the official swearing- in ceremony at the white house, and our coverage will include your phone calls, and we look back at the president's 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 eastern. on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies at the capitol. we will have live all-day coverage monday beginning at 7:00 and the eastern, c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. coming up, a discussion on the safety of the u.s.-mexican border and how immigration is being affected. we will hear from remarks from a homeland assistant secretary in new mexico. that is coming up at 4:15 eastern on c-span. tonight, we will show you inaugural speeches from the last 60 years, starting at 8:00 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's 1981 address, bill clinton in
and with disastrous consequences. should the party of lincoln embrace a path to citizenship so that all persons in our society can earn the right to pursue the american dream? i hope so. should the party of jefferson and our first african american president agreed to a bill that sanctions into law a permit state underclass? i would hope not. there will be a temptation to compromise on this issue and provide the undocumented less than full rights, we must resist this temptation. we will give them a chance to earn the right to become americans. it is the american way. second, the bishops will fight to preserve and enhance family unity as a cornerstone of our national immigration system. this has served to the nation over the past 200 years as immigrant families have helped build our nation. we must not forsake the family in this debate, mothers, fathers, and children, preserving family reunification in and promoting economic growth through our economic system are complementary and not competing goals. finally, we will fight to preserve the right of both u.s. and foreign-born workers in this debate. we w
have been down that road before and with disastrous consequences. should the party of lincoln embrace a path to citizenship so that all persons in our society can earn the right to pursue the american dream? i hope so. should the party of jefferson and our first african american president agreed to a bill that sanctions into law a permit state underclass? i would hope not. there will be a temptation to compromise on this issue and provide the undocumented less than full rights, we must resist this temptation. we will give them a chance to earn the right to become americans. it is the american way. second,second, the bishops willt to preserve and enhance family unity as a cornerstone of our national immigration system. this has served to the nation over theas
and capping it with the statue of freedom which occurred 150 years ago in 1863. when abraham lincoln took office two years earlier, the dome above us was a half built eyesore. conventional wisdom was that it should be left unfinished until the war ended. given the travails and financial needs of the time. but to president lincoln, a half finished dome symbolized a half divided nation. lincoln said "if people see the capital going on, it is a sign that we intend the union shop ilan." so -- the union that should go on. so, the dow continued to rise. on december 2, 1863, the statue of freedom, a woman, was placed atop the dome where she still stands today. in a sublime irony, it was a former slave, now free american who helped to cast bronze statue. our present times are not as perilous or despairing as they were in 1863. but in 2013, far too many doubt the future of this great nation and our ability to tackle our own half finished domes. today's problems are intractable, they say, the times are so complex that differences in the country and the world so deep that we will never overcome them
that occurred 150 years ago in 1863. when abraham lincoln took office, it was i have built eyesore. commissioner wisdom is that it should be left unfinished until the war ended. to president lincoln the half finished dome symbolize they have divided notion. lincoln said it people see the capital going on its is a sign we intend the union shall go on. despite the conflict which engulfed the nation, surrounded the city, and the dome continue to rise. on december 2 comment the statue of freedom was placed atop the dome where she still stands today. it was a former slave who helped cast the statute. our present times are not as airless. in 2013, far too many doubted the future of the nation and our ability to attack our own half finished domes. times are so complex. differences in the country and the world are so deep. we will never overcome them. thoughts like these produce anxiety, fear, and despair. we do well to remember that americans have always been and still are a practical, optimistic, problem solving people. no matter how steep the climb, how difficult the problems, how have finished the t
lincoln. that expression of the spirit of freedom is what we want you to take with you today, and it is contained in this portfolio that you will receive from the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies, along with a frame depiction of the capitol as it appeared at the start of the civil war. you heard it well described by chairman schumer in his remarks. today the statue of freedom and the spirit of freedom watches over the capital as another president from illinois has taken the oath of office. despite the challenges at home and abroad, we heard in president obama's eighth inaugural address a message of hope, a vision of peace, progress, prosperity, and the promise of freedom for all. may god bless you, president obama, vice-president biden, and your families. congratulations, with wishes for much success for you, for that is the success of our nation. may god bless you all, may god bless america. [applause] >> mr. president and dr. biden and your whole wonderful families, i rise now to toast the vice president of the united states and my former colleague and
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)